Accelerometer-determined physical activity and cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults from two generations of the Framingham Heart Study

Nicole L. Spartano, Serkalem Demissie, Jayandra J. Himali, Kimberly A. Dukes, Joanne M. Murabito, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Alexa S. Beiser, Sudha Seshadri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Physical activity (PA) may play a role in maintenance of cognitive function in both middle and older ages and prevention of outcomes such as dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Cross-sectional regression analyses were performed in Framingham Heart Study Third Generation (n = 1861) and Offspring (n = 909) cohort participants assessing the association of accelerometry-measured PA with cognitive function, adjusting for age, sex, accelerometer wear time, education, occupational status/PA, and smoking status. Results: In each cohort, achieving just 10–21.4 min/day moderate-to-vigorous PA related to better executive function (P < .02); and just 10 min/day moderate-to-vigorous PA was associated with better verbal memory in middle-aged adults in the Third Generation cohort (P = .02). In older adults of the Offspring cohort, total PA (measured in steps/day) was associated with better executive function (P < .02). Discussion: PA at levels lower than the current PA Guidelines (just 10 min/day moderate-to-vigorous PA and total PA including lower intensity PA) were associated with better cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)618-626
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Translational Research and Clinical Interventions
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Accelerometer
  • Cognition
  • Epidemiology
  • Executive function
  • Exercise
  • Memory
  • Moderate-to-vigorous
  • Physical activity
  • Sedentary time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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