Aberrant expression of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in Epstein-Barr virus-negative, human immunodeficiency virus-related lymphoid interstitial pneumonia

Katsushi Kurosu, Norio Yumoto, William N. Rom, Jagirdar Jaishree, Koh Nakata, Takayuki Kuriyama, Atsuo Mikata, Michael D. Weiden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analysis was used to analyze the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (Ig VH) genes of open-chest biopsy or autopsy samples from five patients with Epstein-Barr virus-negative human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP), and the results were compared with those for Ig VH genes from five HIV-negative LIP patients. The findings of this study are consistent with the different immunological situations of HIV-related and HIV-negative LIP. (a) The Ig VH3 subgroup was underexpressed in three of five cases of HIV-related LIP. In contrast, none of the HIV-negative cases showed this abnormality. Because the Ig VH3 subgroup encodes the largest portion of Ig VH genes, a depletion of B cells expressing Ig VH3 genes reflects a major alteration in the B-cell compartment. (b) All HIV-related LIP cases demonstrated two or three oligoclonal populations. HIV-negative cases showed minor monoclonal or polyclonal populations, but not oligoclonal ones. These oligoclonal populations suggest the coexistence of several occult clonal B-cell populations in HIV-related LIP. (c) Some oligoclonal clones in HIV-related LIP showed mutated framework regions not demonstrated in HIV-negative clones. This degree of variation exceeds the usual mutation rate for frameworks suggesting a role for framework residues in antigen binding. (d) The frequency of D-D fusions of minor oligoclonal clones (HIV-related LIP) is higher than that of minor monoclonal clones (HIV-negative LIP). Such D-D fusions may enhance the probability of expression of antibodies capable of binding HIV glycoproteins.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1891-1903
Number of pages13
JournalLaboratory Investigation
Volume80
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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