A Pilot Project Demonstrating that Combat Medics Can Safely Administer Parenteral Medications in the Emergency Department

Steven G. Schauer, Cord W. Cunningham, Andrew D. Fisher, Robert A. Delorenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Select units in the military have improved combat medic training by integrating their functions into routine clinical care activities with measurable improvements in battlefield care. This level of integration is currently limited to special operations units. It is unknown if regular Army units and combat medics can emulate these successes. The goal of this project was to determine whether US Army combat medics can be integrated into routine emergency department (ED) clinical care, specifically medication administration. Project Design This was a quality assurance project that monitored training of combat medics to administer parenteral medications and to ensure patient safety. Combat medics were provided training that included direct supervision during medication administration. Once proficiency was demonstrated, combat medics would prepare the medications under direct supervision, followed by indirect supervision during administration. As part of the quality assurance and safety processes, combat medics were required to document all medication administrations, supervising provider, and unexpected adverse events. Additional quality assurance follow-up occurred via complete chart review by the project lead. Data During the project period, the combat medics administered the following medications: ketamine (n=13), morphine (n=8), ketorolac (n=7), fentanyl (n=5), ondansetron (n=4), and other (n=6). No adverse events or patient safety events were reported by the combat medics or discovered during the quality assurance process. Conclusions In this limited case series, combat medics safely administered parenteral medications under indirect provider supervision. Future research is needed to further develop this training model for both the military and civilian setting. Schauer SG, Cunningham CW, Fisher AD, DeLorenzo RA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)679-681
Number of pages3
JournalPrehospital and Disaster Medicine
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • administration
  • combat
  • emergency
  • medic
  • medication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

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