A perinatal signature of light on chronobiology? If so, numerous questions arise and experimental animal research must provide more information

Thomas C. Erren, Russel J Reiter, V. Benno Meyer-Rochow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

That light and melatonin rhythms provide both clock and calendar information in humans and numerous other species is beyond dispute; this holds true for all stages of life, including the very early ones. Experimental evidence elucidates that exposure to light and melatonin titres are keys for the very development of circadian and seasonal rhythms. As evinced by a 2011 publication in Nature Neuroscience such awareness could impact considerably on the design and conduct of experimental studies as well as their subsequent analyses, interpretations and comparisons. Therefore "when and how experimental animals were bred, developed and raised" may be critical when experimenting with animals generally, and not just rodents. As long as the suggested imprinting of circadian system stability via light cues is not falsified, the perinatal season or perinatal experimental light:dark [L:D] conditions that an animal was kept under should be routinely recorded, published and considered in analysing and interpreting study data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-320
Number of pages3
JournalNeuroendocrinology Letters
Volume33
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Light
Melatonin
Dissent and Disputes
Neurosciences
Circadian Rhythm
Cues
Publications
Rodentia
Research Design
Imprinting (Psychology)
Calendars

Keywords

  • Biological rhythms
  • Circadian rhythms
  • Experimental conditions
  • Light
  • Melatonin
  • Perinatal
  • Seasonal rhythms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neurology

Cite this

A perinatal signature of light on chronobiology? If so, numerous questions arise and experimental animal research must provide more information. / Erren, Thomas C.; Reiter, Russel J; Meyer-Rochow, V. Benno.

In: Neuroendocrinology Letters, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2012, p. 318-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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