A model for increasing palliative care in the intensive care unit: Enhancing interprofessional consultation rates and communication

Deborah Villarreal, Marcos I. Restrepo, Jennifer Healy, Bonita Howard, Janet Tidwell, Jeanette Ross, Scotte Hartronft, Marriyam Jawad, Sandra Sanchez-Reilly, Kristin Reed, Sara E. Espinoza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Only a minority of patients who die in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) receive palliative care services. At the South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie L. Murphy Hospital, only 5% of patients who died in the MICU from May to August 2010 received a palliative care consultation. Measures: We measured the percentage of MICU patients for which there was a palliative care consultation during the intervention period. Intervention: Starting October 1, 2010 and ending April 30, 2011, the palliative care and MICU teams participated in daily "pre-rounds" to identify patients at risk for poor outcomes, who may benefit from a palliative care consultation. Outcomes: Palliative care consultation increased significantly from 5% to 59% for patients who died in the MICU during the intervention period. Additionally, palliative care consultation increased from 5% to 21% for all patients admitted to the MICU during the intervention period. Conclusions/Lessons Learned: Daily pre-rounds between the palliative care and MICU teams increased palliative care services for MICU patients at risk for poor outcomes, who may benefit from a palliative care consultation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)676-679
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • Palliative care
  • critical care
  • end of life
  • interprofessional
  • quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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