A low COMT activity haplotype is associated with recurrent preeclampsia in a Norwegian population cohort (HUNT2)

L. T. Roten, M. H. Fenstad, S. Forsmo, M. P. Johnson, E. K. Moses, R. Austgulen, F. Skorpen

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    36 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    The etiology of preeclampsia is complex, with susceptibility being attributable to multiple environmental factors and a large genetic component. Although many candidate genes for preeclampsia have been suggested and studied, the specific causative genes still remain to be identified. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme involved in catecholamine and estrogen degradation and has recently been ascribed a role in development of preeclampsia. In the present study, we have examined the COMT gene by genotyping the functional Val108/158Met polymorphism (rs4680) and an additional single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs6269, predicting COMT activity haplotypes in a large Norwegian case/control cohort (ncases = 1135, ncontrols= 2262). A low COMT activity haplotype is associated with recurrent preeclampsia in our cohort. This may support the role of redox-regulated signaling and oxidative stress in preeclampsia pathogenesis as suggested by recent studies in a genetic mouse model. The COMT gene might be a genetic risk factor shared between preeclampsia and cardiovascular diseases.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article numbergar014
    Pages (from-to)439-446
    Number of pages8
    JournalMolecular Human Reproduction
    Volume17
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

    Keywords

    • 158Met
    • COMT
    • Catechol-O-methyltransferase
    • Haplotypes
    • Preeclampsia
    • Val108

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Reproductive Medicine
    • Embryology
    • Molecular Biology
    • Genetics
    • Obstetrics and Gynecology
    • Developmental Biology
    • Cell Biology

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