A clinical approach to muscle diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Muscle diseases constitute a large variety of both acquired and hereditary disorders that can affect muscle structure, metabolism, or the function of the muscle channel. A successful clinical approach to a patient with a suspected myopathy is based on a thorough medical history and neurological examination. Associated clinical symptoms such as myoglobinuria, contractures, myotonia, cardiac disease, and respiratory insufficiency can be extremely helpful in limiting the differential diagnosis. In addition, a phenotypic approach to diagnosis according to the patient's predominant pattern of weakness is essential for guiding the physician in selecting the most appropriate diagnostic studies. Although muscle biopsy remains a useful tool, molecular genetic studies are now available for the noninvasive diagnosis of many muscle diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-240
Number of pages13
JournalSeminars in Neurology
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Muscles
Myoglobinuria
Myotonia
Neurologic Examination
Contracture
Muscular Diseases
Respiratory Insufficiency
Molecular Biology
Heart Diseases
Differential Diagnosis
Physicians
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Creatine kinase
  • Myalgia
  • Myoglobinuria
  • Myopathy
  • Myotonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

A clinical approach to muscle diseases. / Jackson, Carlayne E.

In: Seminars in Neurology, Vol. 28, No. 2, 04.2008, p. 228-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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