A bio-telemetric device for measurement of left ventricular pressure-volume loops using the admittance technique in conscious, ambulatory rats

Karthik Raghavan, Marc D. Feldman, John E. Porterfield, Erik R. Larson, J. Travis Jenkins, Daniel Escobedo, John A. Pearce, Jonathan W. Valvano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a device to measure pressure-volume loops in the left ventricle of conscious, ambulatory rats. Pressure is measured with a standard sensor, but volume is derived from data collected from a tetrapolar electrode catheter using a novel admittance technique. There are two main advantages of the admittance technique to measure volume. First, the contribution from the adjacent muscle can be instantaneously removed. Second, the admittance technique incorporates the nonlinear relationship between the electric field generated by the catheter and the blood volume. A low power instrument weighing 27 g was designed, which takes pressure-volume loops every 2 min and runs for 24 h. Pressure-volume data are transmitted wirelessly to a base station. The device was first validated on 13 rats with an acute preparation with 2D echocardiography used to measure true volume. From an accuracy standpoint, the admittance technique is superior to both the conductance technique calibrated with hypertonic saline injections, and calibrated with cuvettes. The device was then tested on six rats with 24 h chronic preparation. Stability of animal preparation and careful calibration are important factors affecting the success of the device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)701-715
Number of pages15
JournalPhysiological Measurement
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Physiology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Physiology (medical)

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