ANALYSIS OF INFORMATION TRANSFER IN CEREBELLAR CORTEX

  • Bower, James (PI)

Project: Research project

Project Details

Description

Our overall objective is to better understand how information is
transferred and processed within cerebellar cortical circuitry. The
proposed experiments address issues raised by recent experimental results
which suggest that a re-examination of previously held views about
information transfer from cerebellar granule cells to cerebellar Purkinje
cells is necessary. Based on these recent studies, we have proposed, for
example, that a single granule cell layer activation may have two
distinctly different influences on overlying and nearby Purkinje cells.
This and other related issues regarding this cerebellar circuitry will be
addressed in four sets of experiments with the following specific aims: 1)
to study the synaptic effects of granule cell-parallel fiber activity on
Purkinje cells at varying distances from the focus of granule cell layer
activation; 2) to study the synaptic effects on Purkinje cells of the
convergence of activity evoked in different granule cell layer loci: 3) to
study the amplitudes and temporal delays of parallel fiber synaptic effects
on intracortical inhibitory interneurons; and 4) to study interactions
between Purkinje cells via recurrent collaterals directly by recording
intracellularly from two cells simultaneously. These experiments will
employ intracellular anatomical and physiological techniques using
laboratory rats as subjects. Together, these studies will help fill
conspicuous gaps in knowledge regarding the fundamental organizational
principles underlying the neural processing of information in cerebellar
cortex.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date4/1/853/31/92

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $140,835.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Fingerprint Explore the research topics touched on by this project. These labels are generated based on the underlying awards/grants. Together they form a unique fingerprint.